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In full bloom January 12, 2019

Posted by dolorosa12 in blogging, books, reviews.
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I am not, in general, a person who buys books on the strength of their covers, so Felicia Davin’s Gardener’s Hand trilogy was a bit of a departure for me. But the series’ eye-catching covers, spotted at some point when I was scrolling through my Goodreads feed, and the fact that the trilogy appeared to feature a central relationship between two women was enough to spark my interest, and I’m very grateful for the serendipitous moment that brought these excellent books to my attention. At its heart, this is a series about survival — surviving harsh landscapes, oppression and injustice, cruel family history, and threats both supernatural and mundane. It’s also a series about found family, with a pleasingly ‘us against the world’ dynamic that I always find really appealling.

cover - thornfruit

The setting of these novels is a tidally locked planet, and the various societies that have sprung up within such an unforgiving landscape have found different ways to cope with its inherent problems. Some, on the ‘Dayward’ side of the planet use shades to block out the eternal sunshine, and make ingenious use of courtyards, open windows, and gardens as ways to escape the heat, while other cultures have no taboo against nudity and wear minimal clothing to keep as cool as possible. Those in the hottest possible habitable zone live in carefully engineered underground cities, making clever use of mirrors, skylights and tunnels to let daylight shine into the depths. In the ‘Nightward’ side of the planet, there are heated, enclosed cities carved out of the ice.

But the challenges of this setting are not merely due to excessive sunlight (or its complete absence): there are frequent but unpredictable earthquakes and tsumanis, poisonous ‘medusas’ (which seem to be like giant squids) lurking in the ocean, and the constant human threat against any person exibiting magical powers.

cover - nightvine

One such individual is Alizhan, one of the two heroines of the series, who can read minds, and whose very touch causes pain. She has been raised in isolation as a weapon by Iriyat, a woman with secrets of her own. While Iriyat attempts to wield Alizhan against the various political intrigues of her city, Alizhan has other ideas, and, together with Ev, a physically tough but very soft-hearted childhood friend, she makes a break for freedom, inadvertently uncovering multiple conspiracies and unravelling clues into her own mysterious past. As the narrative unfolds, the two characters begin to realise the extent of what they’re up against: a devastating existential threat against an entire city, and an all-powerful antagonist determined to use this threat for personal and political gain.

cover - shadebloom

The series ranges widely throughout Davin’s imagined world, and it’s a joy to spend time in all its regions, getting to know the cast of characters who appear, disappear and reappear over the course of the series, helping or hindering Ev and Alizhan. My favourite among these would have to be Thiyo, a self-assured, extroverted young man with a flair for the dramatic and the magical ability to learn and speak all languages fluently without any effort. He joins Alizhan and Ev midway through their quest, and his flashy confidence and openness is a great contrast to their guarded, angst-ridden awkwardness.

Most pleasing of all about this trio of characters is their inherent, unwavering goodness. Beneath Thiyo’s attention-seeking and drama, Alizhan’s blunt tactlessness, and Ev’s shyness lies a common heroism, a desire to fight against all injustices, and the refusal to be daunted by the enormity of their task. And, set gloriously against this grander struggle are their own human struggles and growth — all three are in love with each other, and the resolution Davin chooses to deal with this made me so happy. Yes, this trilogy is that rare beast: a love triangle with three bisexual characters (Thiyo had past relationships with men and women) with a satisfactory resolution and a happy ending. For that alone I would recommend it.

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